Website Design

The 4 T's of Why to Avoid Website RFPs

Photo of Jasmine LeBlanc Jasmine LeBlanc - June 27, 2018

Before you go through the process of creating a website RFP, step back and consider why you’re making one in the first place. Are you creating one because it’s just what everyone else does? If so, here are four easy-to-remember reasons of why you should avoid website RFPs, and instead build a lasting relationship with a trusted and proven professional agency that can guide you through a more successful process for your next website redesign.

Woman-stressed-over-website-redesign-choicesThe 4 T’s

In case you need to convince yourself and your team that you don’t need a website RFP, we created a catchy list of 4 main reasons that all start with a ‘T’ so that you can easily remember! We’ll discuss why a website RFP can hinder each of these factors.

1. Time

A proper website redesign does take time, but by going through the RFP process, you are spending time on the wrong things. You are spending a lot of internal admin time on researching, presenting it to a board, making revisions, etc. You could be spending the time finding the right solution for your next website with a reputable, experienced agency.

To be frank, website RFPs are an outdated, unnecessary process. So before you begin, think about why you are spending the time creating one the first place.

2. Technology

While you may be an expert in your line of work, redesigning a website to meet your organization’s needs may not be in your wheelhouse. And that’s okay! By letting experts help you scope out the requirements and needed technology for your website, you are ensuring your website will successfully hit your goals.

When you create an RFP without having expertise in website design and development, you are risking the possibility of setting false expectations in regards to needs, time, budget, and quality.

3. Team

When you fill an RFP with website requirements and hand it over to an agency, you are limiting the creative ideas that could be generated for your website. By working actively and openly with a local, expert team you will not only build your network, but you will be clearly communicating the needs of your website to a team that can help you achieve the most optimal, creative solution for your new website which can help save you time and money while meeting all of your needs.

So instead of focusing all of your effort on creating an intricate RFP, focus it on finding a knowledgeable team of creative professionals that can help you meet your website’s needs with the most optimal, creative solution.

4. Target

One of the main purposes of having a website is to meet your organization’s goals. Sometimes formulating the proper goals for your website project can be tricky. By working with a goal-driven agency, instead of writing an RFP, you can be certain that your next website design project will be crafted to meet your organization's needs and will be tailored to your target audience.

Any reputable agency will focus on developing your website goals first, and then on incorporating your organization’s buyer persona(s) into the planning process to ensure that your website’s design and content strategically achieve your goals. However, if you create an RFP, you are hindering crucial dialogue between your organization and an agency to work together and craft your organization’s target goals and target website visitors.

 

We strongly encourage you to partner with an agency versus employing one via an RFP. By doing so, you’re allowing qualified experts to provide you with expert advice on your website and ensuring your final solution hits your deadlines and budget while meeting your performance and design expectations.

However, sometimes creating an RFP is out of your hands. It may be required by your organization’s policy. If that’s the case, then try to make the most of your website RFP. To do this, be open to your agency’s feedback so that your website can be as successful as possible. For an effective RFP, be sure to include these 4 things that everyone forgets to include in website RFPs.